Out there (CMKY)- exhibition at IMPACT 2020 in Hong Kong

layers1Salt prints and photoetchings of fragmented landscapes, are held together in open frames. These are then hand coloured, alluding to the history of early ‘colour’ photography, using cyan, magenta, black and yellow- the same separations used in printmaking processes today.

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Ground Resist (2019)

 

This series looks at the notion of the disappearing landscape, through photo etchings made in situ. In this way, photographs of the Jurassic coast are re interpreted and printed as composite solar plate etchings, using the sun and water at the site to expose and develop the prints. The plates are then imbued with the traces of the place itself, and work as a metaphor for the geological and paleontological remains that can be found there. These address not only our relationship to the past, but our encounter with the landscape in the present and future. The continuously eroding landscapes of the south west coast of the UK in turn reveal their secrets of our origins in their crumbling strata.  In the Anthropocene, these non-toxic processes become ever more relevant, as does the memorialization and conservation of these originary landscapes. These photo etchings are further suspended from wooden rods, which echo the fragmented debris found at the site, and the way printmaking and photography suspend time. Printmaking processes often excavate and reveal in their surfaces, as marks left behind. In this way, these prints cross numerous boundaries: in place and space, from the Jurassic coast to the space of the gallery, as well as the contingent histories of photography and printmaking. Furthermore, the photo etching prints are hand-coloured, bringing back a unique quality to them, while alluding to the use of hand colouring in early photography before the invention of colour images. Here our origins can be found, and the crossovers between practices remind us of the expanded field that printmaking lies in today, as well as our role as artists in highlighting the political concerns of our time.